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Onion rings. Do they have a place in a burger?

I thought they were a great idea in the beginning. But having had a handful from a variety of restaurants, I’m not so sure now. They lose their crunch and even worse, turn into a soft mess. Gimmicky? Perhaps.

While other burger restaurants are looking for the next weird combination, Brgr.Co focus on the most important ingredient of a burger – the patty.

Brgr.Co’s menu is peppered with phrases such as ‘a culinary work of art containing delectable cuts of beef‘ and ‘meat lovers dream‘ – am I dreaming? Safe to say Brgr.Co are particularly proud of their Black Angus beef burgers.

And so they should be. They really hammered home the point when I sat down to read more information on what seems to be the cow of all cows.

This isn’t just a burger. It’s a Brgr.Co burger *cue sultry music.

I ordered a signature 8oz ‘Butcher’s Cut’ burger (£8.45) described as the ‘best cuts are the ones the butcher keeps for himself‘. Well if it’s good enough for the butcher…

 

When it arrived, I nearly reached for my sunglasses the bun was glistening that brightly! But it’s what was underneath the bun that I was really interested in. Brgr.Co had built expectations of their Black Angus burger up until now.

It didn’t disappoint. It was probably the juiciest burger I’ve ever had. Don’t believe me? I think the drippings speak for themselves. And that’s not including the burger juice that went all over my hands too. Luckily there are extra napkins on the table – this is probably a regular occurrence for customers so points to Brgr.Co for being prepared.

The aftermath  - Brgr.Co

As I continue my pilgrimage to find the best burgers in London, I’ve found a common problem. Buns disintegrating from the juiciness of a burger (I’m looking at you insanity burger at Stax Diner). Brgr.Co didn’t have that problem. I’m pleased to report the bun was a soldier and continued to soak up everything that was thrown at it.

Brgr.Co make it easy to customise your burger to your own taste, just add toppings from the selection on the menu. I chose Swiss gruyere cheese (£1.25) and crispy bacon (£1.50). I also ordered a plate of parmesan truffle fries (£5.45) – the poshest fries I’m likely to ever have.

Parmesan truffle fries  - Brgr.Co

Chips and cheese is a timely classic and it was a nice classy spin by topping with guyere cheese and truffle oil. If I was being super picky I would have liked all of the cheese to have been melted. But the vast majority of the melted cheese was a delicious condiment to dip the chips into, creating a creamy pool at the bottom of the bowl.

While Brgr.Co may serve burgers and chips, they aren’t an American diner by any means. Far from it. Dark wood surrounds you while staff are dressed in white shirts and blacks trousers. With your gourmet burger you can even have the choice of wines or mixers with bourbon, rum and vodka.

 

If you’re looking for a burger without the frills and distractions of onion ring-type gimmicks, you’d be hard pressed to find a better cut of beef than Brgr.Co.

Something that grabbed my attention reading the menu was their ‘American’ afternoon tea – of burgers. That’s right. They’ve replaced the quintessential English pastime of sandwiches and scones with mini burgers, iced tea and doughnuts. Oh my. Will definitely have to come back for that.

In Soho and don’t fancy a burger? Read my Indian restaurant Cinnamon Soho reviewSouth African inspired Bunnychow review, or Korean BBQ Bibigo Review.

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TCLondon Food ReviewsSohoOnion rings. Do they have a place in a burger? I thought they were a great idea in the beginning. But having had a handful from a variety of restaurants, I'm not so sure now. They lose their crunch and even worse, turn into a soft mess. Gimmicky? Perhaps. While other...A travel blog featuring interviews and guest posts about destinations around the world. Why not have your say and write for us?

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